levarburtonisacinephile

RSS

TIFF 2014 Review: 'Girlhood' Captures the Unique Process of Growing Up That Many Black Girls Must Navigate

zebablah:

There is a dismal lack of great coming of age stories about black girls. There’s Spike Lee’s “Crooklyn” or Leslie Harris’s “Just Another Girl on the I.R.T.” or Dee Rees’s “Pariah” - but try listing at least six off the top of your head; you’ll likely come up short. Why? Perhaps because black girlhood is a kind of myth. Black girls don’t get to experience the awkwardness of adolescence, the discovery of budding sexuality, the gradual blossoming into womanhood.

Black girls are women before they hit puberty, thrust into a kind of pseudo-adulthood by a world often unable to view them outside the context of hard-fixed stereotypes. When they grow breasts and ass in adolescence they’re warned not to be “fast”, while they’re simultaneously sexualized and exoticized and encouraged to view their sexuality as their only source of value. They’re dismissed as too aggressive and angry, while taught that to be anything other than “strong and independent” - vulnerable, playful, carefree - is to be the opposite of who they are. It’s a distinct kind of in-between, so rarely explored in any kind of substantial way.

This year, we got a movie called “Boyhood.” It was beautiful. It was also heralded by many a critic as the film of a generation, a “universal” story chronicling twelve years in the life of a young white boy growing up before our eyes over the course of three hours. But, like so many stories that focus on young white males, it’s been heavily read as gender neutral, an everyman tale that everyone should be able to relate to.

But while in many ways a soaring cinematic experience, “Boyhood” didn’t resonate with me, a lifelong Richard Linklater enthusiast, the way I thought it would. It wasn’t wholly alienating, but there were few points of entry, few moments where I could detach myself from the experience of watching the film and actually experience the film. This isn’t necessarily a bad thing, but it’s one of the main reasons why Céline Sciamma’s “Girlhood” is so vital.

Sciamma is known for her past forays into the female coming of age story with “Water Lillies” and “Tomboy,” but here she shifts her focus exclusively to a 16 year-old black girl, Marieme (Karidja Toure), as she grapples with her own state of in-between, dealing with bad grades at school, a crush on a boy from the block, and the menacing violence of her controlling older brother.

While the film’s French title “Bande de filles” can be translated to “Girl Gang,” naming it “Girlhood” for the English market is its first playful and defiant gesture. Here, Marieme, a dark-skinned black girl living in the ‘hood just outside of Paris, gets to be the universal everywoman, the singular point in the narrative with which we must constantly be engaged.

Marieme becomes friends with a tough group, led by the savvy and charismatic Lady (Assa Sylla), who introduce her to a world of shoplifting, drinking and drugs, and YouTubed street fights. Gratefully, Sciamma does not turn this into a kind of cautionary tale, an ethnographic foray into the lives of wild packs of “ratchets”. The girls are not condemned or dismissed for their bad behavior, or held to a higher standard that in their white counterparts is so often romanticized (think “Palo Alto”, for instance.) Instead, their actions are presented without bias and without judgement…

My review of Girlhood is live. Click here to read the rest. This movie is so important. I have so much more to say. Like I couldn’t even say everything that needed to be said. Like. what even. 

Shimmy Shimmy Ya
Ol' Dirty Bastard

5by5kevin:

Shimmy Shimmy Ya // Ol’ Dirty Bastard

pmpkn:

Silent Hills (PS4) - TGS 2014 Trailer 

i-always-slytherwin:

Saw this outside a store near my house, please spread! This is in the Spring Valley area of San Diego, but please spread it in case any of your followers are from around here!

i-always-slytherwin:

Saw this outside a store near my house, please spread! This is in the Spring Valley area of San Diego, but please spread it in case any of your followers are from around here!

(Source: tendads)

I figured maybe it would be ok.Then comes the sub-titles. Now, it’s great if you like subtitles, I guess, but the agony of ‘reading is fundamental’ for a 2-hour action-horror movie is pretty lame. Ok for Gone With The Wind, not good for horror, or anything where dialog is CONSTANT!

- On The Host (via onestarmoviereviews)

bartonfinks:

If that Most Violent Year trailer showed me anything it’s that Bradford Young is just CRUSHING it right now.


Nastassja Kinski, 1981

Nastassja Kinski, 1981

(Source: mabellonghetti)

M.E.
Gary Numan

der-ausgang:

Gary Numan - M.E. (1979)

We’re all so run down
I’d call it my death but I’ll only fade away
And I hate to fade alone

owning-my-truth:

rubyvroom:

Sorry for the extremely lengthy post on your dashes but this is so important

SHARE THIS!